Oct, 08
2014
tea-tree-oil-uses


When starting the Phase One lifestyle, you are likely trying to clean up more than just your diet. Sure, you've gotten rid of the grains, sugar, corn, peanuts, pasta, potatoes and alcohol. You've substituted heavily processed, chemical-laden meat products for lean, organic and grassed meats. You've replaced snack foods, candy and crackers with nuts and seeds. You're enjoying some fruits and a whole lot of vegetables. In short, you've cleaned up your diet. But what about the other products that that you use on and in your body?

 

Many of the commonly used topical lotions and ointments available come with a long, arcane list of ingredients, including many ingredients that––according to some researchers––aren't the most beneficial for health. However, most people apply these products often and liberally without considering the possible risks.

 

As part of the Phase One Diet, consider swapping out some of your cosmetics and other household products for more natural options. A great example of a natural substitute for certain products is tea tree oil. The uses for tea tree oil are primarily topical, but tea tree oil uses encompass a broad spectrum of applications, with research being done on new applications all the time. As research continues, and with the number of acceptable tea tree oil uses growing all the time, it is an invaluable tincture to have around. Tea tree oil is a powerful anti-fungal––something we certainly appreciate at Know the Cause––and for people suffering from a topical fungal condition, it proves to be an invaluable commodity.

 

Below are some of the best uses for tea tree oil that will render some of your conventional products moot. Please remember: Tea tree oil is only recommended for topical use, and be sure to only use with permission from a licensed healthcare professional.

 

Tea Tree Oil for Acne

It is no secret that acne can have a dietary component; beginning a Phase one Diet may help to clear up some skin conditions you're dealing with. However, tea tree oil may provide a little extra support for those that suffer from acne. In some studies, tea tree oil solutions have proven as effective as other, more traditional chemical treatments in clearing up acne. Tea tree oil typically does't clear skin as quickly as conventional treatments, but it has been shown to irritate skin much less. 

 

Athlete's Foot

Tea tree oil has proven to be just as effective as some over the counter medicine in clearing up athlete's foot, a common fungal condition. 

 

Nail Fungus

Nail fungus, or onychomycosis, is a common fungal condition of the nails. Applying tea tree oil to affected areas has been shown to have great benefit. Remember, at Know the Cause, we believe that visible fungal infections often signify a deeper fungal problem. Try tea tree oil in tandem with a Phase one Diet for best results. 

 

Dandruff 

Tea tree oil is available in some kinds of shampoo, and has shown some benefit for sufferers of dandruff. 

 

Yeast Infections

Early evidence may show that the anti-fungal properties of tea tree oil have some efficacy against yeast infections.


 


 

Fungus-Link-Vol3

The Fungus Link Vol 3

Both Doug Kaufmann and David Holland, MD discuss topics such as the fungus link to skin diseases, postpartum depression, weakened immunity, bladder disease, kidney stones, obesity and sick building syndrome.  This book includes the assessment of antifungal supplements and antifungal prescriptive drugs as well as the Antifungal program and diets.


 

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