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This link is updated regularly and contains technical data supporting the role of fungi and their byproducts in the disease process.  The purpose of this link is twofold; 

1. Many physicians, nurses or other healthcare professionals want more information on the fungus link to serious illness prior to prescribing anti-fungal medications or recommending a dietary change for their patients.  The articles posted in this link are scientific and with few exceptions are taken from medical journals familiar to healthcare workers.  In the interest of brevity, Luke Curtis, MD, locates relevant articles and then extrapolates the information making review simple.  Of course, the entire article is also attached.

2. Many lay people ask us for technical data supporting the link between exposure to fungus and symptoms and diseases.  We encourage all visitors to this site to take some time and study these technical articles prior to initiating lifestyle changes, including dietary changes and to do so with their physician's awareness and approval.  Tens of thousands of scientific articles confirm a fungus or fungal byproduct link to disease.  Attached are more recent articles.
May, 08
2012
luke-curtis

Exposures to pesticides can increase risk of asthma, some forms of cancer,  mental depression, and neurological problems such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

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luke-curtis

High blood levels of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) or “Bad Cholesterol” have been associated with higher levels of hardening of the arteries (arteriosclerosis), heart disease and strokes. A number of studies have reported that dietary nutrients from fiber rich foods like oatmeal and nuts can significantly reduce blood levels of LDL cholesterol.

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May, 08
2012

Cinnamon May be Helpful for Diabetics

luke-curtis

Diet is critical for controlling both type 1 and type 2 diabetes.  Diabetics should eat a least 3 moderate sized meals daily.  Each meal should contain some protein, fat and carbohydrate.  A moderate amount of complex carbohydrates from whole fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains can be eaten.  (Although whole grains are oftentimes  contaminated with mycotoxins.)

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May, 08
2012

High Potassium Diet May be Helpful for Arthritis

luke-curtis Catsfur made a good comment about rheumatoid arthritis patients being low in potassium.  A number of studies have reported that rheumatoid arthritis patients tend to be low in potassium and may benefit from a high potassium diet.   The exact mechanism in which potassium helps rheumatoid arthritis is not well known- but may involve better hormonal function of the hypothalamic- pituitary- adrenal axis.

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May, 08
2012

Diet May be Helpful in Rheumatoid Arthritis

luke-curtis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common joint problem with about 0.5% of adult men and 1.0% of adult women having rheumatoid arthritis. Rheumatoid arthritis involves immunological processes that cause swelling of the synovial fluid located between the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis is especially common in feet, ankles, knees, hands, and proximal (inner) joints on each finger.

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